Author Archives: Industrial Designer Marcio Dupont

About Industrial Designer Marcio Dupont

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Design Calls from the Design Research Society

31 October – 1 November 2018 – Whats Going On? A Discourse on Fashion,
Design & Sustainability


Centre for Sustainable Fashion is proud to announce it will be hosting
the 6th edition of the Global Fashion Conference, taking place at
University of the Arts London, London College of Fashion on the 31st
October and 1st November 2018, with the aim of stimulating the
international debate around fashion, design and sustainability through
the lens of design thinking and practice, and coinciding with the
celebration of CSFs 10th anniversary.

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The typology of Design Sprints

In this talk from ProductTank San Francisco, Kai Haley (Lead of Design Relations and the Google Sprint Master Academy) and Burgan Shealy (UX Design Lead at Google) share insights into what are the different types of design sprints, and various ways they can be crafted to meet a team’s goals and needs.

At its core, a design sprint is a tool for answering a critical business question through design prototyping and testing with users. The goal is to ensure that you are building the right things for your customers.

What Kinds of Problems can you Solve With a Design Sprint?

This process can be applied to many different needs, from generating a vision for a new product, or redesigning a specific feature or flow for an existing product, to improving a process or defining a brand.

A design sprint can allow the team to take a fresh look at a wide landscape of possibilities, discover and prioritize different solutions to a problem in a fast, iterative way. When possibilities seem too wide to move forward, a sprint can help prioritize and test out what one of the directions might look like “in action”.

Design Sprint Types

In this talk you’ll learn about four different sprints and hear examples on how Google uses them to solve critical problems for companies like Headspace, Google Home Services, Baewindow, or for non-profit companies such as Doctors Without Borders or Tangerine Tutor.

The Typology of Design Sprints at ProductTank SF

  1. Product Sprint – this is one of the most popular methods, and is used to solve challenges like improving the onboarding experience for new users, identifying critical user journeys to understand breakpoints, or generating and testing ideas for new features in order to increase engagement.
  2. Process Sprint – this method can be used to improve the process for hiring new employees, define the process for rolling out a new tool, or simplify the process for approving new project.
  3. Vision Sprint – a fun and creative way to solve critical problems such as: creating a vision to help homeowners fix problems in their home, defining a new product offering for two years from now in IoT, exploring opportunities around the needs of children and technology.
  4. Moonshot sprints – these give you the opportunity to innovate and reimagine your product or service, helping you to make space to explore something that might not necessarily be on your roadmaps. You may be re-imagining how people shop for food, exploring ways to build customer loyalty, or even discovering new models for monetization.

Whatever your challenge is, these methods are a great toolbox you can use and adjust to meet your needs. They allow you to look at a problem with 360 degree view, get alignment for your product & business perspective, and bring your team together to determine where you want your product to go in the future.

Specialized Training Course in Accessibility and Inclusive Design in Portugal

The School of Architecture of the University of Minho (EAUM) promotes once again the specialized training course in Accessibility and Inclusive Design. This specialized training course aims to answer to the challenges of the current market, increasingly sensitive to the problems of the elderly or disabled.

Providing an update of the contents and examples of good practices on accessibility and inclusion in the design of spaces and products. The concept of inclusive design promotes the development of solutions that improve the lives of all people, regardless of their abilities or condition, benefiting everyone as it consider new requirements and generally translate into innovative solutions.

The specialized training course, scheduled to begin on April 13, for a period of 12 weeks, will take place on Friday afternoons at the Azurém Campus of the University of Minho, Guimarães.

Application DEADLINE: MARCH 21


For further information, please contact us through email or phone +351253510500


Reconstructing Practice: Toward an Antiracist Art & Design Field

Reconstructing Practice: Toward an Antiracist Art & Design Field
July 13 – 14 at ArtCenter College of Design
  • How can we construct an antiracist art and design practice?
  • How do our curriculum, research practices, and models reinforce or dismantle problematic racial hierarchies?
  • How might simply occupying space advance this endeavor?

Join us in July + Submit your Ideas by March 31

Reconstructing Practice is a convening featuring sessions, social spaces, and media that aims to provide opportunities for young creators—of color, especially—to engage with and through art, design, media and/or technology. Participants will ignite and sustain a movement toward a more racially equitable, informed, and carefully-considered creative practice and lifetime learning environment.
Between now and March 31, Reconstructing Practice invites contributions from designers, artists, technologists, and media creators—especially, but not limited to, people of color. Contributors are invited to submit proposals for facilitated discussions, film screenings or performances, hands-on workshops, social events, and panel presentations on research methods, practice, or theory. The field of practice—as long as it falls into some aspect of art, design and/or technology—and exact type of session are less important than the idea’s relevance to at least one of the convening’s three thematic areas, described here:
• Taking Up Space
• Constructing a Counter Canon
• Imagining and Manifesting Alternatives
For more about the event, visit the Reconstructing Practice website or reach out to the organizers at

Designing for and Teaching Accessibility

To raise awareness and provide specific examples of ways to incorporate principles of accessibility into professional practice and design education, Design Incubation and AIGA/New York is inviting a group of scholars, practitioners and industry leaders to discuss accessible digital design and its relevance to the New York design community.

A morning panel discussion will provide a venue for experts to share their knowledge and an optional afternoon workshop will promote understanding of basic accessibility issues, concepts and best practices.

At a minimum, criteria for success of a designed product, service or experience should be its usability by everyone, regardless of their abilities or disabilities. Since digital access is a Civil Right covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act, the question of usability and access are now as important to digital and interactive designers as to those who produce products and physical artifacts.

“Inclusive design” theory and practice are becoming the norm with companies increasingly expecting employees to know the common standards and specifications for accessible interfaces which are used by people with disabilities (and meet legally mandated ADA compliance standards). Unfortunately, even as progress has been made in industry, teaching digital accessibility is rarely part of design curriculum or undergraduate course work.

For more information, see

All are welcome, but this workshop will be most useful for designers and educators who are less familiar with best practices around accessible design and want to learn more about how to practice and/or teach inclusive digital access and interactive design/graphic design/visual communications.

Saturday, 14 April 2018
10:00-4:00 pm
General Assembly, New York City

9:45AM-10:00AM Attendee check-in

10:00AM-12:00PM Panel Discussion
Bo Campbell is an Interaction Designer and Accessibility Design Lead at IBM.

Elizabeth Guffey teaches art and design history at SUNY Purchase. She is author of several books, including Designing Disability: Symbols, Spaces and Society

Liz Jackson is the founder of the Inclusive Fashion & Design Collective, a disability design organization that is focused on increasing the impact of beautiful, functional products in our everyday lives and in the global economy.

Neil Ward is currently an Assistant Professor of Graphic Design at Drake University.

1:00PM-4:00PM Workshop (limited space)
Integrating Accessibility Workshop:
Inclusive Design Methodologies and Practice
Bo Campbell, Accessibility Design Lead for IBM, will conduct a workshop on accessible design while focusing on disability as a design challenge.

How to encourage diversity in the design industry from CB

Read the article at Creative Bloq



Illustrations by Guillaume Kashima