Author Archives: Industrial Designer Marcio Dupont

About Industrial Designer Marcio Dupont

Industrial Designer from Brazil. Innovating Ecosystems with more inclusion and sustainability. http://br.linkedin.com/in/marciodupont DESIGN HUB: https://twitter.com/maducao

Non-anthropocentric Design

Resources and comments from:
Birger Sevaldson PhD
Professor
Institute of Design
Oslo School of Architecture and Design
www.aho.no
www.systemsorienteddesign.net
www.systemic-design.net
www.ocean-designresearch.net

RESOURCES:

Michael Hensel
https://scholar.google.no/citations?user=Dkm2bhAAAAAJ&hl=no&oi=sra
https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do;jsessionid=0ED50E775510022C17F1F0AFF5705CFC?uin=uk.bl.ethos.578023

https://books.google.no/books?hl=no&lr=&id=p4b0kAkak4IC&oi=fnd&pg=PP9&dq=michael+hensel+non-anthropocentric&ots=y6k1_uqnW8&sig=nYApZxE1N2CUxoalfmJOgRFjXjg&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=michael%20hensel%20non-anthropocentric&f=false

Marie Davidova published a thesis and some papers on involving the issue inspired by Hensel and others, demonstrating practice experiments involving biotic and abiotic agents in co-designing processes.
https://scholar.google.no/citations?user=khIp35kAAAAJ&hl=no&oi=sra

The rise of user centric design is truly problematic when looking beyond its obvious immediate benefits. We should be able to have a multi-centric design approach, an approach that is systemic. (ref. www.systemsorienteddesign.net  and www.systemic-design.net  )
Mayve user centric design is the most anthropocentric design perspective?

Here some sources criticising user centric design:

Norman, D. A. (2005). Human-centred design considered harmful. Interactions, 12(4), 14–19. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Donald_Norman/publication/200086092_Human-centered_design_considered_harmful/links/0c9605208fca197c2e000000.pdf

Wagenknecht, S. (2017). Beyond non-/use: The affected bystander and her escalation. New Media & Society, 1461444817708775.


From Erik:
I recently published a storybook, Designer and Goldcrest, intended as an accessible introduction to some more-than-human perspectives on design. It’s freely available here: https://www.sorgenfripress.se.

Jönsson, L. (2014). Design events: On explorations of a non-anthropocentric framework in design. The Royal DanishAcademy of Fine Arts, School of Design.

Avila, M. (2012). Devices. On Hospitality, Hostility and Design. HDK – School of Design and Crafts Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.


Advertisements

The Cost of Design UK

DesignHistorySociety

Design History Annual Conference 2019: The Cost of Design
Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK
5-7 September 2019

‘The Cost of Design’ explores the complexities of the historic and contemporary relationship between design and economy. Design is both influenced by, and can shape, economic systems. Both ‘cost’ and ‘economy’ are to be understood beyond their financial implications. ‘Cost’ is en-visaged as the exchange of resources, meaning or value. The conference looks at how design sustains, accelerates or challenges dominant systems and examines the resulting social, cultur-al, economic or environmental consequences that arise. It examines the roles of design in rap-idly changing economies, examining the relationship between technological advances and the economy. ‘The Cost of Design’ also looks at design’s relationship to the political economy and the global/regional/local exchanges occurring within. Design practices can react to, resist, challenge or seek to influence economies that are viewed to negatively impact in some way. The ways in which design has been used to affect positive change within economic systems will also be examined.
The conference welcomes historic, contemporary and interdisciplinary approaches to the top-ic, and invites contributions from design historians, scholars, and academics in related fields, as well as design practitioners and educators, museum professionals and students.

Topics might include:

Technological and changing economies
·       Impact of automation
·       Digitisation of design culture
·       Hybridisation of physical and virtual spaces

Political economies and global/local exchange
·       Supply chains, manufacture and relocation vis-à-vis geopolitical and cultural borders
·       Challenges to/persistence of dichotomies of North/South; East/West; Centre/Periphery
·       Dynamics of transcultural (intra- or extra regional) design
·       The relationship between design and soft power
·       Appropriation and Copyright

Resistance, sharing economies and design
·       Design for “post-growth” economies
·       Political design in a national/regional/local context
·       Artisanal/craft solutions
·       Indigenous autonomy
·       Designing for wellbeing, happiness and social values

Individual papers of 20 minutes, or proposals for full panels of three papers related to the top-ics listed above or theme of ‘The Cost of Design’ will be considered. Panel proposals must in-clude abstracts for all three papers, in addition to a short description of the panel theme.
All proposals will be double-blind reviewed and selected by the conference committee.

Submissions are due Monday, 25 February 2019 and should:
1.      Be sent in the form of a Microsoft Word document (.doc, .docx)
2.      Not exceed 300 words
3.      Include the title of the paper
4.      Include the author’s full name, title, position and institution
5.      Include a brief professional biography (not exceeding 50 words)
Submissions should be sent to costofdesign.dhs2019@gmail.com to the attention of the Academic Convener.
The Design History Society at https://www.designhistorysociety.org/

The relationship between user experience (UX) designers and machine learning (ML) data scientists has emerged as a site for research since 2017. Central to recent findings is the limited ability of UX designers to conceive of new ways to use ML (Yang et al. 2018). This is due to a number of factors. Firstly, human […]

via Designing machine learning — Research Imagining

Understanding the use of Field Research in Design

Mapping Complex Information. Theory and Practice

Sense-blog-post-Decipher-recap-01-1-1280x806 Participants asking questions during the beginning of the workshop. 

Last month, I attended the Decipher Conference organized by AIGA Design Educators Community and hosted by the Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor (Michigan). The conference was focused on themes related to defining, doing, disseminating, supporting, and teaching design research. In addition to the holistic approach to the topic, I really welcomed the idea of a hands-on conference with three types of sessions: activity groups, conversations and workshops, rather than the conventional conference format structured around keynote speakers and paper presentations. Furthermore, this conference was an excellent opportunity to interact and connect with design researchers, practitioners, and educators from different universities and organizations.

As a participant and workshop facilitator, my main takeaway is related to the gap between research theory and practice. I unpack my learnings below.

The gap between research…

View original post 538 more words

How to Rent Your Ideas to Fortune 500 Companies

I first met Stephen Key in 2001. Two months later, I used a few recommendations of his — shared over the customary gin tonic — to help a friend double overseas sales in less than two weeks in New Zealand and Australia.

How? Licensing. It can be a beautifully elegant model.

Stephen is somewhat famous in inventing circles for two reasons. First, he consistently earns millions of dollars licensing his ideas to companies like Disney, Nestle, and Coca-Cola. Second, he is fast. It seldom takes him more than three weeks to go from idea to a signed deal. Continue reading

The Intergalactic Design Guide

“Design has built global brands, disrupted industries, and transformed our lives with technology. It has also contributed to the complex challenges we face today. In The Intergalactic Design Guide, business strategist and designer Cheryl Heller shows how social design can help address our most pressing challenges, from poverty to climate change.

Social design offers a new approach to navigate uncertainty, increase creativity, strengthen relationships, and develop our capacity to collaborate. Innovative leaders like Paul Farmer, Oprah Winfrey, and Marshall Ganz have instinctively practiced social design for decades. Heller has worked with many of these pioneers, observing patterns in their methods and translating them into an approach that can bring new creative energy to any organization. From disrupting the notion of “expert” by seeking meaningful input from many voices to guiding progress through open-ended questions instead of five-year plans, social design changes how humans relate to each other, with powerful positive impacts.

The Intergalactic Design Guide explains eleven common principles, a step-by-step process, and the essential skills for successful social design. Nine in-depth examples—from the CEO of the largest carpet manufacturer in the world to a young entrepreneur with a passion for reducing food waste—illustrate the social design process in action.

Social design is a new kind of creative leadership that generates both traditional and social value, and can change the way we all view our work. Whether you are launching a start-up or managing a global NGO, The Intergalactic Design Guide provides both inspiration and practical steps for designing a more resilient and fulfilling future.”
Visit: Island Press

Follow author at LinkedIn