Category Archives: graphic design

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Design Online from Australia

Who is Leading the Pack in Design Research and Why?

Where Industry Meets Academia: Who is Leading the Pack in Design Research and Why?

Hosted by the CAA Committee on Design
Chair: Dan Wong
Email: dan@dan-wong.com

Is industry making the greatest contribution and impact to design, or is research in the academy doing it behind the scenes? Is it time for more PhD programs in design?

This panel discussion will span design disciplines. We invite academic design researchers, design practitioners, agency principals, and design entrepreneurs to participate in this discussion of the investment in design research and the establishment of contemporary design thinking, methodologies, and technologies.

The deadline to submit your proposal is August 6th 2017. Please follow the guidelines here: http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/programs/conference/CAA-CFP-2019.pdf.

Proposals (including a title and 250 words maximum) should be sent to dan@dan-wong.com

Please note that a current CAA: Advancing Art and Design membership is required to participate in the conference. However, If you are not a member of CAA at the time you submit the proposal, you can still submit—email CAA Membership Services at membership@collegeart.org or call them directly at 212-392-4430 and they can create a temporary CAA account number so that you can move forward with your submission.

Please see the following list of FAQ for more information:
http://www.collegeart.org/programs/conference/FAQ

Design + Territory

DESIGNA 2018 – International Conference on Design Research
November 29-30 . FAL-UBI . Covilhã . Portugal

DESIGN + TERRITORY

DESIGNA celebrates its 7th edition in 2018, choosing to promote the debate and provide visibility to the ongoing research regarding the connection between Design and Territory, as well as its multiple and complex dimensions.

Design not only interacts with Territory, but it can also be one of the latter’s crucial transformation agents, due to the sizable and significant part it plays in the appreciation of local resources and contribution to identify and reveal the history, culture and predicates of communities where several of the products and services it projects are, in fact, generated.

Regardless, Design’s role understandably pivots around the conceptual innovation and renovation of products, production procedures, communication strategies and overall services associated with general goods. Thus, its focus could actually be quite efficient when altering the perception which distinct agents from a certain value chain may nurture about the potential of very diverse territories, particularly through its ability to integrate different scopes of human activity, from agriculture to tourism, craftsmanship to science, gastronomy to the industry.

Contemporary Design and the myriad of knowledge and values it encompasses may easily facilitate the dialogue, as well as integrate and explore multiple dimensions from historically underestimated individuals and communities, both locally and within more cosmopolitan spheres.

Design changes people’s lives, alters routines, shifts expectations, opens markets and, most of all, has the ability to – through the thought and projectual action that defines its practices – connect production’s several dimensions with the ones from distribution and fruition, as much in a local as in a global scale, bestowing them with a cultural purport.

Also, it is in concrete territories that transformation opportunities are created, through the development of actions and projects that are able to answer, from bottom up and in a participated manner, to the complex issues and restraints emerging from the operative social-economical models with an increasingly hegemonic propensity.

Design can undoubtedly contribute to build alternatives there. On the other hand, the duo Design / Territory summons the topics from DESIGNA’s previous editions, particularly the ones concerned with Projectual Hope, un/Sustainability and Identity, although multimedia interfaces and the overall components from desire and lapse can also be easily reflected and detected in it.

Deadline for abstract (extended) – July 15, 2018
——————————————–
From the editor:
If you are portuguese speaker, the following book is highly recommended:
Design e Território by Lia Krucken Interview at ABC Design 

The difference between Inclusive Design and Accessibility

If you’re familiar with what we do here at Eone, you probably know that we’re an inclusive design company, known for our feature product, the Bradley timepiece.

But what is inclusive design? And what’s the difference between inclusive design and accessibility? We’d love to tell you more about our design philosophy and why it’s important!

Two things we really care about are good design and inclusion for people with disabilities. What started as a simple problem shared between friends blossomed into Eone: a company with a social mission to create beautiful, functional products that meet the needs of as many people as possible. And that’s the core of inclusive design.

The Problem With Good Design: Why Good Design Isn’t Good Enough

The truth is that “good design” considers the best form and function for some people, but excludes many people on the basis of ability — and individuals with disabilities are often left out. We want to change that.

We’ve built Eone on our core conviction that design should be inclusive, bringing more people in instead of shutting them out. We believe that design shouldn’t discriminate or divide us up, but bring us together.

We believe that individuals with disabilities should have equal and integrated access to quality products, services, and structures — that everyone has a right to enjoy beautiful, functional design, and that we all benefit when we enjoy design together.

We believe inclusive design is a social justice issue.

Through inclusive design, we’re creating the change we wish to see in the world.

What is Inclusive Design?

Sometimes called universal design, inclusive design considers as many people’s needs and abilities as possible. Instead of assuming a one-size-fits-all user experience, inclusive design aims to please a diverse range of individuals and accommodate a variety of experiences and ways of interacting with the world.

Inclusive design recognizes that our needs shift with time and circumstance, so it anticipates different ways an individual might interact with the world as life goes on. Aging, permanent or temporary disability, carrying a load of grocery bags, pushing a stroller, or sitting in a business meeting are some examples of circumstances that impact how you interact with the world around you — circumstances that might change what you do or how you do things.

What’s the Difference Between Inclusive Design and Accessibility?

While inclusive design considers from the very beginning how something might be easily useful and enjoyable for as many individuals as possible, accessibility traditionally means making special considerations for people with disabilities. It’s the difference between designing a watch that can be read by touch or sight, and taking a standard analog watch and adding braille instead of numbers. The first example considers the functionality and beauty of a watch that doesn’t require sight, while the second example tries to take something designed for vision and make it work for touch without addressing some of the problems this modification creates.

Unlike assistive devices, inclusive design doesn’t specifically target people with disabilities. While assistive devices fill in the gaps left by exclusionary design practices, inclusive design aims to evolve products beyond their conventional definitions, changing our standards for products. Assistive devices aim to remove a barrier for people with disabilities. Inclusive design strives to fundamentally redesign a product so that the barrier does not exist in the first place. Assistive technology is reactive. Inclusive design is proactive.

How Eone Approaches Accessibility

At Eone, we utilize both approaches: building accessibility into what we do from the beginning, and addressing issues of access on platforms we use but do not own.

There are certain cases in which Eone cannot make something inclusive because we do not have control over design and user experience, such as social media platforms, retailer partner websites, and other properties we do not own. However, to the best of our ability, we aim to make accessible our use of platforms and third party sites — using the features available to us in ways that accommodate the most users.

From Eone website

The hidden women in architecture and design

>>At the New Yorker Magazine: “The hidden women…”

Article from Alexandra Lange – architecture critic for Curbed.