Category Archives: sustainable design

Rethink everything!

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Atmosphere 11 ADAPTATION

 

‘Atmosphere’ is an annual, interdisciplinary design symposium advancing academic enrichment and inter-disciplinary research by creating an opportunity for students, instructors, and friends of the faculty to interact with distinguished keynote speakers, scholars and designers from around the world. The three-day event includes invited lecturers, peer-reviewed presentations, exhibitions, student installations, receptions, and numerous casual opportunities for serious exchange.

Atmosphere is the consequence of the projects we make as designers of landscapes, cities, buildings, and interiors. Atmosphere is hard to grasp, and even harder to talk about – yet the production of atmosphere, intended or not, is one of our most apparent contributions to the world. Though palpable, atmosphere resists registration. So fragile and dependent on the world around, atmosphere is also susceptible to our perception. It is not something that can be read or interpreted. It is.

 

‘Atmosphere’ 11 will explore ADAPTATION. This theme intends to attract researchers from diverse disciplines into an open but topically oriented exchange. ADAPTATION is a mutation, a change that aids organisms to thrive in their environments. ADAPTATION implicates designers as organisms with the particular places, materials, contingencies and intentions that enable survival or better living in an increasingly unpredictable environment. In other words, this symposium will examine not merely what and how we adapt, but the sites and situations of adaptation. The aim is to critically and creatively explore how contextual, cultural and environmental circumstances of our world serve as meaningful catalysts for design, building, teaching and research within a discussion of atmosphere and adaptation. This theme encompasses multifaceted, dynamic scales and terrains including the complexities of our social fabrics, intricacies of environmental function, potentials of adaptation as process, as fitness, the materials and patina of our everyday adaptations, and the stories and arguments that share understandings of our designed world. Do we engage in pre-ADAPTATION? Do we register atmosphere through adaptation?

The Faculty of Architecture has hosted an ‘Atmosphere’ symposium each year for the last ten years. ‘Atmosphere’ invites exploration of the less physical conditions of design: the temporary, experiential, situational, phenomenal and epiphenomenal states of our shared world. Difficult to pin-down, capture and express, ‘atmosphere’ is enveloping yet recessive. It is what we as designers, planners and interpreters of the built and natural world strive to generate, understand, and meaningfully engage.

VISIT: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/architecture/atmosphere/2019/

 

Design Harvesting with Full Grown

Full Grown Ltd grows trees into shapes. Initially concentrating on furniture production like chairs, tables.

It´s one of the design futures and connects many concepts like circular economy, sustainability, biomimetics.

How far are we from growing our environment and all the possible objects?

THE FIRST SHOE MADE FROM CHEWING GUM

The soles of these shoes are made from recycled chewing gum
from the streets of Amsterdam.

In the Netherlands 1.5 million kilos of gum ends up on the street every year.
Making it the second most common litter after cigarettes.

By buying these shoes you contribute to the solution, by wearing them you show your support.

Design + Territory

DESIGNA 2018 – International Conference on Design Research
November 29-30 . FAL-UBI . Covilhã . Portugal

DESIGN + TERRITORY

DESIGNA celebrates its 7th edition in 2018, choosing to promote the debate and provide visibility to the ongoing research regarding the connection between Design and Territory, as well as its multiple and complex dimensions.

Design not only interacts with Territory, but it can also be one of the latter’s crucial transformation agents, due to the sizable and significant part it plays in the appreciation of local resources and contribution to identify and reveal the history, culture and predicates of communities where several of the products and services it projects are, in fact, generated.

Regardless, Design’s role understandably pivots around the conceptual innovation and renovation of products, production procedures, communication strategies and overall services associated with general goods. Thus, its focus could actually be quite efficient when altering the perception which distinct agents from a certain value chain may nurture about the potential of very diverse territories, particularly through its ability to integrate different scopes of human activity, from agriculture to tourism, craftsmanship to science, gastronomy to the industry.

Contemporary Design and the myriad of knowledge and values it encompasses may easily facilitate the dialogue, as well as integrate and explore multiple dimensions from historically underestimated individuals and communities, both locally and within more cosmopolitan spheres.

Design changes people’s lives, alters routines, shifts expectations, opens markets and, most of all, has the ability to – through the thought and projectual action that defines its practices – connect production’s several dimensions with the ones from distribution and fruition, as much in a local as in a global scale, bestowing them with a cultural purport.

Also, it is in concrete territories that transformation opportunities are created, through the development of actions and projects that are able to answer, from bottom up and in a participated manner, to the complex issues and restraints emerging from the operative social-economical models with an increasingly hegemonic propensity.

Design can undoubtedly contribute to build alternatives there. On the other hand, the duo Design / Territory summons the topics from DESIGNA’s previous editions, particularly the ones concerned with Projectual Hope, un/Sustainability and Identity, although multimedia interfaces and the overall components from desire and lapse can also be easily reflected and detected in it.

Deadline for abstract (extended) – July 15, 2018
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From the editor:
If you are portuguese speaker, the following book is highly recommended:
Design e Território by Lia Krucken Interview at ABC Design 

Designing with and for People with Dementia

Designing with and for People with Dementia: Wellbeing, Empowerment and HappinessInternational Conference 2019 of the MinD consortium, the DRS Special Interest Group on Behaviour Change and the DRS Special Interest Group on Wellbeing and Happiness
Date: Thursday-Friday 19-20 September 2019

Venue: TU Dresden, Germany
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Regenerative Design and Ecosystem Biomimicry

‘This book examines and defines the field of biomimicry for sustainable built environment design and goes on to translate ecological knowledge into practical methodologies for architectural and urban design that can proactively respond to climate change and biodiversity loss. These methods are tested and exemplified through a series of case studies of existing cities in a variety of climates. Regenerative Urban Design and Ecosystem Biomimicry will be of great interest to students, professionals and researchers of architecture, urban design, ecology, and environmental studies, as well as those interested in the interdisciplinary study of sustainability, ecology and urbanism’.

Get a discount of 20% if you want to buy it. Enter the code FLR40 at the checkout.

You can find it online as a printed book or ebook here.

Or you can read quite a bit of it online for free via google books

Author:

Dr Maibritt Pedersen Zari

Senior Lecturer – Sustainable Architecture / Interior Architecture

School of Architecture  

Victoria University   – New Zealand

Academia.edu profile | Researchgate profile | Dr Maibritt Pedersen Zari research website