Category Archives: innovation

Curso Ceo Startup- Brasil

curso-ceo-startup-180831094323

Neste mundo global e inovador, temos dois “players” fundamentais:

De um lado, startups que chegaram para ficar, nos mostrando que sempre existe uma forma mais rápida, econômica e inovadora de solucionar problemas complexos.

Do outro lado, grandes corporações, com sua valiosa tradição, maturidade e experiência de mercado.

E a duvida que aparece em ambos “ambientes” é geralmente:

O que eu como startup posso aprender com as grandes corporações?

O que eu como grande corporação posso aprender com as startups?

Sendo assim como fazer esta conexão com troca de experiências, conhecimentos e habilidades?

 

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Thanks to Berry < Follow her

Design Thinking Handbook

What is design thinking? More than a methodology or framework, design thinking combines the problem-solving roots of design with deep empathy for the user. The design thinking-based framework popularized by the Stanford d.school can help your team take on the thorniest challenges with insightful solutions.

VISIT: http://snip.ly/bgzz9b#https://www.designbetter.co/design-thinking

In this guide, you’ll learn how to put design thinking into practice in your organization.

When empathy is not enough

Designers need to go beyond empathy to include the disabled community as participants in design solutions.

By Shaina Garfield, Industrial Design Intern, frog

The Disability Design Panel was hosted by Shaina Garfield in frog’s New York studio. Video with closed captioning above.

In 2015, I was diagnosed with a chronic illness that I thought I would heal from within a few months. Years passed and I did not heal. At points, I was unable to walk and needed a cane, yet I refused to consider myself disabled. I was embarrassed by the thought of it. However today, nearly four years later, I am proud to identify with such an amazing community.

Being a disabled designer has given me given unique skills to see the built world in a different way, because it has not been designed for disabled people. To explore these perspectives, I joined the WITH Fellowship, a program that facilitates design with the disability community by partnering disabled creatives in top design studios.

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Design Thinking Visualized

Over the last year I drew all my notes at Stanford class on Design Thinking in a visual way that anyone can understand.

I captured the whole course of lectures in one fun, visual format that makes it very easy to explain some of the concepts or method of design thinking to a colleague or a friend.

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What do we mean BY DESIGN?

This article originally appeared as part of Design for Europe and was written by Bas Leurs and Isobel Roberts from Nesta.

What comes to mind when you think of design? For many people, the word conjures up thoughts of creativity, products, architecture, graphics, or simply the way something looks or functions.

These are all valid responses, and in some ways capture what we might class as traditional forms of design. Today the practice of design regularly extends beyond these boundaries to encompass broader techniques, methods and approaches. When we talk about design in the field of innovation our focus is more on what we might call ‘strategic design’.

As the diagram below illustrates, design can function at multiple levels and in different ways. Design professor Richard Buchanan captured his thinking into these ‘four orders or design’ illustrating how design as a discipline has moved from the traditional concept of the visual or tangible artefact through to orchestrating interactions and experiences, and to transforming systems.

Four orders of design

This model demonstrates the scope and role design can play. Designing a symbol or a logo is of course a skill, but is generally perceived to be relatively straightforward. Designing for a system or service however, is much more complex and multifaceted. At this end of the spectrum, design can be extremely complex. It can involve many actors and stakeholders, often with varying or and often conflicting interests or objectives. Design thinking in that sense often refers to the mindset and skills needed to work with the complexity around interactions and systems.

 

Everybody designs who devises courses of action aimed at changing existing situations into preferred ones.

Herbert Simon, 1969

As the quote from Herbert Simon describes, designing isn’t just for professionals. It is a fundamental human activity and capability, and humankind has in fact been designing since it began inventing and using tools thousands of years ago. Planning your day in an efficient way or rearranging your furniture to allow for better flow are examples of modern everyday activities that involve design skills.

Design is also about change, and that can be good or bad. But the importance here is that design should be about improving situations as design should be is ultimately about making things better. This approach can be applied to policymaking and public service provision too – you create policies and services because you want to create a preferred situation, a future state, that is better than the current state.

When we talk about design in the field of innovation, our focus is on designing solutions for – and often with – others to achieve that a desired future state (i.e. strategic objective). The concept of “fit” is key in this process. Design is ultimately about generating a fit across a number of different elements:

Fit triangle

This diagram is of course an oversimplified representation and lacks the richness and complexity that surrounds these elements in reality, but it is still useful helpful for understanding key relations around “fit”. These three key relations are:

  • Solution-problem fit: the solution should provide the right for the problem.
  • Solution-user fit: the solution should fit with the user’s physical and cognitive capabilities, preferences and needs.
  • Solution-provider fit: the solution should fit with the business processes of the solution provider(s).
Fit triangle policy

This idea of ‘fit’ can also be expanded to other areas that involve design activity, such as policymaking. Take for example the problem of growing childhood obesity. A government might tax sugar-sweetened drinks as a policy intervention to tackle this issue. But how does this fit with the motivations and everyday routines of children? Will it change their behaviour? And how does it fit with government processes? How will it be enforced this policy, and what departments will need to collaborate on it? How much manpower will it take?

Bear in mind that design doesn’t pursue to generate a perfect fit across all three dimensions, rather it aims create a fit that’s good enough. In order to do that, there are four principles that help generate this fit and that anyone can learn and use:

Fit triangle principles

Empathising

One of the core principles of design is empathy; that by putting yourself in the shoes of your users and learning as much about them as you can, you are more likely to create solutions that hit the mark for them.

Iterating

Assessing whether a solution is good enough to address the problem should be tested through a trial and error process. This is the essence of prototyping. By building prototypes, any assumptions on what might work are tested at an early stage, and this often leads to a revised definition of the problem, or an improvement in the design of the solution.

Collaborating

Particularly in emerging design disciplines such as social design and service design, design catalyses change by bringing people together and enabling collaboration. Professional designers, or design thinkers, can often help play a coordinating role here by bringing internal and external stakeholders together to deliver an integrated offer.

Visualising

Through visualisation, complex information can be made comprehensible to support decision-making. Visual thinking is the universal language of design that helps to drives experimentation, build common ground across stakeholders and share user insights.

These approaches might feel unfamiliar, but remember that design is something that everybody has the capacity to do.

FROM DESIGN COUNCIL UK

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If Screen Product Designers Designed Physical Products

In the past, when someone asked me what my profession was, I would usually say Product Designer. They would immediately ask me what kind of product. Furniture, airplanes, radios, headphones, sex toys? Embarrassed, I would clarify that I meant digital products—“you know, like websites and apps.” To which I would receive a look of confusion.

“I like to call those things products because they make me feel important. But usually, I just work with pixels and make-believe stuff,” I would further explain.

Now I just say I’m a designer.

 

This hasn’t avoided questions, though. I still have to clarify that no, I don’t design interiors, clothes, or lamps (but I would love to!)

I often wonder what would happen if I got to design physical products coming as a screen product designer. Would I follow the same human-centered process or would I try to design pixel-perfect chairs?

Here are some comics exploring this idea.

Note: After each image, there’s a text version of the comic. This is so that they’re a bit more accessible, in case you wonder why the redundancy.

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