Category Archives: design thinking

Design Online from Australia

Advertisements

Who is Leading the Pack in Design Research and Why?

Where Industry Meets Academia: Who is Leading the Pack in Design Research and Why?

Hosted by the CAA Committee on Design
Chair: Dan Wong
Email: dan@dan-wong.com

Is industry making the greatest contribution and impact to design, or is research in the academy doing it behind the scenes? Is it time for more PhD programs in design?

This panel discussion will span design disciplines. We invite academic design researchers, design practitioners, agency principals, and design entrepreneurs to participate in this discussion of the investment in design research and the establishment of contemporary design thinking, methodologies, and technologies.

The deadline to submit your proposal is August 6th 2017. Please follow the guidelines here: http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/programs/conference/CAA-CFP-2019.pdf.

Proposals (including a title and 250 words maximum) should be sent to dan@dan-wong.com

Please note that a current CAA: Advancing Art and Design membership is required to participate in the conference. However, If you are not a member of CAA at the time you submit the proposal, you can still submit—email CAA Membership Services at membership@collegeart.org or call them directly at 212-392-4430 and they can create a temporary CAA account number so that you can move forward with your submission.

Please see the following list of FAQ for more information:
http://www.collegeart.org/programs/conference/FAQ

The Non-Designer´s Guide to Design Thinking

 

 This book illustrates the key components of mastering design thinking based on the author’s experience at the Institute of Design of Illinois Institute of Technology, one of the most famous Design schools in the world.

The author highlights the difference between the business world and the design world based on his own experience.

His big transition from the logical world of business, as former P&G marketer, to the design world.

His experience helps non-designers learn design thinking by providing comparisons to business protocol.

 

The author categorized the key components of design thinking into 4 parts: 

1. Thinking: Hybrid Thinking 

2. Mindset: Creator Spirit 

3. Process: Human Centered Co-Creation 

4. Environment: Switching to Creative mode through Tools and Space

   In later chapters, the author proposes the framework of how to start a career in the business design world and finally how design thinking might influence your well-being. This book is a compass for you, and and any non-designer, to start mastering design thinking.

In this book you will:

 Understand how non-designers can learn design thinking

 Understand the four components of a design thinker

More information at: http://www.nondesignersguidetodesignthinking.com/

The World’s First Co-learning space is Amazing and it´ll be in Brazil!

A brazilian place for Education, Design, Innovation and Technology.

How I feel when I see the Colearning Space project

I had the privilege of growing up in a Culture of Learning.

It took moments of isolation, deep abstractions and focus for me to develop the autonomy and the freedom to experiment, create and imagine how things could be different.

This has become the best part of me. And throughout the years I’ve learned that I connect with people by ideas.

Continue reading

Workshop in Inclusive Design from DMI

Jeanine Spence

Principal, Current Associates

Inclusive Design Workshop

Inclusive Design considers the full range of human diversity to deliver better experiences for everyone. This workshop  will help you focus on both a mind shift and changes to your design and research methods that will:

  • Help you recognize your biases/exclusion
  • Alter your practices to reduce exclusion
  • Help you see ways to bring others along on the transformation journey

This workshop starts with an overview of Inclusive Design principles, the impacts of exclusion, and the business case for inclusion. The centerpiece of the workshop is the Inclusive Design Practices Framework, an immersive examination of how learning from diverse lived experiences challenges designers to approach problems from new perspectives and to let go of the fictional “average customer”.

This approach moves past typical accessibility considerations to emphasize making products and services that work better for everyone. In the concluding section, participants reflect on how their design and research practices will evolve when inclusion is the focus.

Who Should Attend?

  • Designers / Design Leaders
  • Design Researchers
  • Product Managers
  • Individual contributors whose work has an impact on the future of the organization
  • Human Resources Professionals

What Will You Learn?

  • You’ll learn to recognize how products and experiences unintentionally exclude people.
  • Get a framework that will give you concrete ways to include more perspectives and create more inclusive results for a broader impact.

Pricing:

This workshop is being held in conjunction with the Innovative Thinking on Diversity & Inclusion Conference
If you are attending the conference: $300 per person

If you are not attending the conference: $450 per person

Register for The Workshop Here

Location:

LPK Mansion and Innoventures Hall
22 Garfield Place
Cincinnati, OH

Pentagram’s Natasha Jen: “Design is not a monster you ‘unleash’ to fix the world”

Speaking at this year’s Design Indaba, Pentagram partner Natasha Jen makes her feelings on business buzzwords, simplistic flow diagrams and sticky note brainstorm sessions very clear, insisting that the concept of “design thinking” undermines design.

Courtesy of Design Indaba and Pentagram

“It’s very hard to explain to people what a graphic designer does,” says Natasha Jen, partner at Pentagram’s New York office. “I think of my role as playing with words, symbols and images. It’s about making things tangible and understandable, and if we can make things delightful – that’s the goal.”

Continue reading

The typology of Design Sprints

In this talk from ProductTank San Francisco, Kai Haley (Lead of Design Relations and the Google Sprint Master Academy) and Burgan Shealy (UX Design Lead at Google) share insights into what are the different types of design sprints, and various ways they can be crafted to meet a team’s goals and needs.

At its core, a design sprint is a tool for answering a critical business question through design prototyping and testing with users. The goal is to ensure that you are building the right things for your customers.

What Kinds of Problems can you Solve With a Design Sprint?

This process can be applied to many different needs, from generating a vision for a new product, or redesigning a specific feature or flow for an existing product, to improving a process or defining a brand.

A design sprint can allow the team to take a fresh look at a wide landscape of possibilities, discover and prioritize different solutions to a problem in a fast, iterative way. When possibilities seem too wide to move forward, a sprint can help prioritize and test out what one of the directions might look like “in action”.

Design Sprint Types

In this talk you’ll learn about four different sprints and hear examples on how Google uses them to solve critical problems for companies like Headspace, Google Home Services, Baewindow, or for non-profit companies such as Doctors Without Borders or Tangerine Tutor.

The Typology of Design Sprints at ProductTank SF

  1. Product Sprint – this is one of the most popular methods, and is used to solve challenges like improving the onboarding experience for new users, identifying critical user journeys to understand breakpoints, or generating and testing ideas for new features in order to increase engagement.
  2. Process Sprint – this method can be used to improve the process for hiring new employees, define the process for rolling out a new tool, or simplify the process for approving new project.
  3. Vision Sprint – a fun and creative way to solve critical problems such as: creating a vision to help homeowners fix problems in their home, defining a new product offering for two years from now in IoT, exploring opportunities around the needs of children and technology.
  4. Moonshot sprints – these give you the opportunity to innovate and reimagine your product or service, helping you to make space to explore something that might not necessarily be on your roadmaps. You may be re-imagining how people shop for food, exploring ways to build customer loyalty, or even discovering new models for monetization.

Whatever your challenge is, these methods are a great toolbox you can use and adjust to meet your needs. They allow you to look at a problem with 360 degree view, get alignment for your product & business perspective, and bring your team together to determine where you want your product to go in the future.