Category Archives: design thinking

inspirON – Sustainability training hackathon

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Designers, Engineerings, Inventors and Pioneers in New Business…
If you care about Design and Sustainability, but struggle to know where to get started, this is a one-of-a-kind opportunity for you!

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Healthcare designers and research

Image from article.
ARTICLE BY Jane Repin Carthey – LinkedIn
She is an architect and researcher with over 30 years experience in hospital design in Australia, New Zealand, East Timor and other countries. She founded the Australian Health Design Council in 2012 to provide networking opportunities and knowledge sharing between designers, clinicians, researchers and other interested professionals in the health architecture domain. She recently completed a Doctor of Creative Industries at Queensland University of Technology that investigated the role of user groups on healthcare projects in Australia and New Zealand.

I recently peer-reviewed an academic paper that explored how well architects and other designers understand and value ‘research’. The author also looked at the degree to which architects engage in or initiate research studies, and then apply original findings to their projects. Reading this paper led me to reflect on how architects define research, and the place of it within the myriad of other information sources that influence architectural work. It also led me back to some research that I conducted earlier in my academic career in conjunction with the then Royal Australian Institute of Architects that investigated the sources of information that architects preferred to use to support their practice.[1]

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Design Thinking as a Tool for Interdisciplinary Education in Health Care

Abstract

Problem 

Grappling with complex structural health care issues requires medical professionals to have training in skills and knowledge that go beyond the basic and clinical sciences. It is also crucial for health care professionals to be able to work collaboratively. However, medical education has only limitedly institutionalized the teaching of these skills.

Approach 

In fall 2014, a one-semester crossover course called Hacking Healthcare was developed by the University of Amsterdam in cooperation with the Gerrit Rietveld Academie of Fine Arts and six health care institutions in the greater Amsterdam area. The course comprised one or two weekly three-hour evening sessions consisting of a lecture, workshop, and group work. It was structured using the three stages of the design thinking process—inspiration, ideation, and implementation. Twenty-seven medicine, psychology, other science disciplines, and art students participated, working in interdisciplinary groups on an assigned case study.

Outcomes 

The course yielded both unconventional and holistic key insights and a wide range of tangible outcomes, which were also considered to be relevant by the patient. Among university (i.e., nonart) students (n = 14), the average overall score of the course was 8.5 out of 10, with 10 being the highest rating. Aspects of the course that were mentioned as positive points were the activating teaching environment, academic development, and development of collaboration skills and creative capabilities.

Next Steps 

This approach could be applied in other fields, such as medical education on a larger scale, clinical practice, and the design of scientific research.

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Hyper Island Toolbox

Workshop Design Canvas

 

Build on years of workshop planning and facilitation experience.

Dramatic arc

Reminds you to maintain a dramatic arc, and not get lost in the details of the workshop steps.

Before and After thoughts

Workshops begin way before the participants show up, and hopefully have an impact way after the venue is cleaned up and empty.

Workshop Governance

Having dedicated responsibilities makes running complex workshops easier

 

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