Design + Territory

DESIGNA 2018 – International Conference on Design Research
November 29-30 . FAL-UBI . Covilhã . Portugal

DESIGN + TERRITORY

DESIGNA celebrates its 7th edition in 2018, choosing to promote the debate and provide visibility to the ongoing research regarding the connection between Design and Territory, as well as its multiple and complex dimensions.

Design not only interacts with Territory, but it can also be one of the latter’s crucial transformation agents, due to the sizable and significant part it plays in the appreciation of local resources and contribution to identify and reveal the history, culture and predicates of communities where several of the products and services it projects are, in fact, generated.

Regardless, Design’s role understandably pivots around the conceptual innovation and renovation of products, production procedures, communication strategies and overall services associated with general goods. Thus, its focus could actually be quite efficient when altering the perception which distinct agents from a certain value chain may nurture about the potential of very diverse territories, particularly through its ability to integrate different scopes of human activity, from agriculture to tourism, craftsmanship to science, gastronomy to the industry.

Contemporary Design and the myriad of knowledge and values it encompasses may easily facilitate the dialogue, as well as integrate and explore multiple dimensions from historically underestimated individuals and communities, both locally and within more cosmopolitan spheres.

Design changes people’s lives, alters routines, shifts expectations, opens markets and, most of all, has the ability to – through the thought and projectual action that defines its practices – connect production’s several dimensions with the ones from distribution and fruition, as much in a local as in a global scale, bestowing them with a cultural purport.

Also, it is in concrete territories that transformation opportunities are created, through the development of actions and projects that are able to answer, from bottom up and in a participated manner, to the complex issues and restraints emerging from the operative social-economical models with an increasingly hegemonic propensity.

Design can undoubtedly contribute to build alternatives there. On the other hand, the duo Design / Territory summons the topics from DESIGNA’s previous editions, particularly the ones concerned with Projectual Hope, un/Sustainability and Identity, although multimedia interfaces and the overall components from desire and lapse can also be easily reflected and detected in it.

Deadline for abstract (extended) – July 15, 2018
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From the editor:
If you are portuguese speaker, the following book is highly recommended:
Design e Território by Lia Krucken Interview at ABC Design 
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“Twentieth-Century Design and the Immigrant Professional in the Americas”

Seeking contributors for a session, “Twentieth-Century Design and the Immigrant Professional in the Americas” at the College Art Association annual meeting from February 13-16, 2019 in New York City.

Please submit a 300-500 word abstract to mcguirel at hawaii.edu by the deadline of August 6th.

Session abstract:
Although the significant contributions of European designers who fled Nazi Europe for North and Latin America have been long recognized by historians, the broader situation of immigrant professionals – from across the globe – in twentieth-century design history remains an area ripe for scholarly examination.

This session seeks to complicate and enrich our understanding of the roles of immigrant commercial, industrial, and decorative designers in the Americas. As newcomers either by choice or by force, immigrant professionals faced singular challenges as they sought to adapt to their adopted lands.

To what degrees did the economic, ethnic, and professional difficulties they encountered shape the products of American design, design practice, and design culture?

To these ends, papers might examine not only immigrants’ professional strategies and successes but also their challenges and failures.

How did social, economic, and personal hardships, such as racism, discrimination, and cultural politics affect their professional labors?

Did the ideas and methodologies that they brought with them sometimes fail to translate in their new professional, cultural, and aesthetic spheres, and if so, what can these reveal about the history of twentieth-century American design?

Alternatively, how have some immigrant designers or immigrant groups proposed concepts that fundamentally challenged and altered the status quo?

From a historiographic perspective, how have dominant histories of design hindered a more nuanced history of the American immigrant experience?

Papers that examine lesser-known practitioners are particularly welcome, as are papers that interrogate the works of canonical designers from a perspective that highlights their status as immigrants.

Designing with and for People with Dementia

Designing with and for People with Dementia: Wellbeing, Empowerment and HappinessInternational Conference 2019 of the MinD consortium, the DRS Special Interest Group on Behaviour Change and the DRS Special Interest Group on Wellbeing and Happiness
Date: Thursday-Friday 19-20 September 2019

Venue: TU Dresden, Germany
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Design & Neoliberalism: Special Issue

This special issue of Design and Culture examines the ways in which neoliberalism has both expanded and constricted the purview of design across multiple disciplines, including (but not limited to) product design, interaction design, graphic design, advertising, branding, fashion, digital media, experience design, web design, architecture, furniture, and other adjacent areas of inquiry and practice.
This call for papers seeks submissions that engage global perspectives on the intersections between design and neoliberalism across this wide variety of design and design-related fields. Of particular interest are submissions engaging historical perspectives, the context of the Global South, and questions of labor.
Neoliberalism has emerged over the past decade or so as a totalizing conceptual apparatus for understanding a wide array of contemporary phenomena. Whether understood politically as a system of governance that submits all functions to the authority of market directives, economically as the financialization of capitalism, or socially as the erosion of collective institutions, neoliberalism has impacted cultural production in myriad ways.
Design, when analyzed critically, has often been portrayed as complicit if not synonymous with these transformations. As Guy Julier has observed, “Design takes advantage of and normalizes the transformations that neoliberalism provokes” (Julier 2014). That is to say, design practices in this context not only organize themselves according to neoliberal political, economic, and social goals and systems, but also promote neoliberal structures and values.
Much existing work on the intersection between neoliberalism and design focuses upon the fields of architecture and urbanism, as well as humanitarian design and design activism. This issue seeks to examine connections between design and neoliberalism that have yet to be explored.
How have neoliberal economic policies shaped and constrained design, and how has design contributed to the financialization of previously uncommodified sectors of life?
How has design adapted to the increasing proliferation of global networks of exchange?
In what ways has design discourse intersected with neoliberal ideologies about work, value, creativity, experience, politics, institutions, etc.?
Topics for consideration may include, but are not limited to:
  1. • Historical convergences and/or divergences of design and neoliberalism
  2. • Design and globalization and/or nationalism
  3. • Neoliberal design ideologies in the context of international development
  4. • Race and racism at the intersection of design and neoliberalism
  5. • Discourses of innovation and “design thinking”
  6. • Design and labor and/or class
  7. • The coalescence of design and business in both the academy and industry
  8. • Conflicts and convergences between neoliberal design and modernist traditions
  9. • Indigenous design in the context of neoliberalism
  10. • Design, neoliberalism, and postcoloniality
  11. • Challenges to neoliberal design ideologies and practices
  12. • Neoliberalism and design pedagogy

Submission deadline: November 30, 2018

Manuscripts should be between 5,000 and 7,000 words long, including notes and references, and may include 4–8 images. For additional submission guidelines, please visit: http://designandculture.org/page/submissions.
All manuscripts will be externally reviewed and should be submitted through Design and Culture’s online portal: http://www.designandcultureadmin.org/index.php/dc/login.
After submitting, please email the title of your paper to the guest editors:
Arden Stern – arden.stern at artcenter.edu
Sami Siegelbaum – samisiegelbaum at gmail.com

The difference between Inclusive Design and Accessibility

If you’re familiar with what we do here at Eone, you probably know that we’re an inclusive design company, known for our feature product, the Bradley timepiece.

But what is inclusive design? And what’s the difference between inclusive design and accessibility? We’d love to tell you more about our design philosophy and why it’s important!

Two things we really care about are good design and inclusion for people with disabilities. What started as a simple problem shared between friends blossomed into Eone: a company with a social mission to create beautiful, functional products that meet the needs of as many people as possible. And that’s the core of inclusive design.

The Problem With Good Design: Why Good Design Isn’t Good Enough

The truth is that “good design” considers the best form and function for some people, but excludes many people on the basis of ability — and individuals with disabilities are often left out. We want to change that.

We’ve built Eone on our core conviction that design should be inclusive, bringing more people in instead of shutting them out. We believe that design shouldn’t discriminate or divide us up, but bring us together.

We believe that individuals with disabilities should have equal and integrated access to quality products, services, and structures — that everyone has a right to enjoy beautiful, functional design, and that we all benefit when we enjoy design together.

We believe inclusive design is a social justice issue.

Through inclusive design, we’re creating the change we wish to see in the world.

What is Inclusive Design?

Sometimes called universal design, inclusive design considers as many people’s needs and abilities as possible. Instead of assuming a one-size-fits-all user experience, inclusive design aims to please a diverse range of individuals and accommodate a variety of experiences and ways of interacting with the world.

Inclusive design recognizes that our needs shift with time and circumstance, so it anticipates different ways an individual might interact with the world as life goes on. Aging, permanent or temporary disability, carrying a load of grocery bags, pushing a stroller, or sitting in a business meeting are some examples of circumstances that impact how you interact with the world around you — circumstances that might change what you do or how you do things.

What’s the Difference Between Inclusive Design and Accessibility?

While inclusive design considers from the very beginning how something might be easily useful and enjoyable for as many individuals as possible, accessibility traditionally means making special considerations for people with disabilities. It’s the difference between designing a watch that can be read by touch or sight, and taking a standard analog watch and adding braille instead of numbers. The first example considers the functionality and beauty of a watch that doesn’t require sight, while the second example tries to take something designed for vision and make it work for touch without addressing some of the problems this modification creates.

Unlike assistive devices, inclusive design doesn’t specifically target people with disabilities. While assistive devices fill in the gaps left by exclusionary design practices, inclusive design aims to evolve products beyond their conventional definitions, changing our standards for products. Assistive devices aim to remove a barrier for people with disabilities. Inclusive design strives to fundamentally redesign a product so that the barrier does not exist in the first place. Assistive technology is reactive. Inclusive design is proactive.

How Eone Approaches Accessibility

At Eone, we utilize both approaches: building accessibility into what we do from the beginning, and addressing issues of access on platforms we use but do not own.

There are certain cases in which Eone cannot make something inclusive because we do not have control over design and user experience, such as social media platforms, retailer partner websites, and other properties we do not own. However, to the best of our ability, we aim to make accessible our use of platforms and third party sites — using the features available to us in ways that accommodate the most users.

From Eone website