51 Female Inventors and Their Inventions That Changed the World

Female inventors, scientists, and engineers have discovered countless revolutionary and life-changing inventions that have caused unprecedented breakthroughs in the history of the world.

Read the article at Interesting Engineering

Advertisements

Handbook Service design principles: 100 ideas to improve the user and customer experience

From the handbook With this handbook, I don’t want to preach the high value of Service Design. I don’t want to explain all the theoretical details about it. This book doesn’t respect academic principles. This book doesn’t give an overview of what Service Design is. This book doesn’t detail design methods. Some other people do […]

via Handbook Service design principles: 100 ideas to improve the user and customer experience in simple and practical ways. — Fred Zimny’s Serve4impact

The 9 big design trends of 2019

Everyone is overworked and unhappy. Digital platforms have sucked the last of our attention and sanity. If you read the headlines in 2018, you’d have every reason to feel pessimistic about the future.

But the design experts we talked to–from companies such as Microsoft, Google, Ideo, and Forrester–offer a glimmer of hope. As they look forward to 2019, they agree on one thing: The cold, corporate thinking that has defined the business world over the past several years doesn’t jive with how people want to live. In 2019, people will be more than mere data points; it’s a designer’s job to make sure of it. Here are nine key design predictions for 2019.

Nordic Design Resource

Welcome to the Nordic Design Resource


These are the results of the first ever comprehensive study of the Nordic design resource.
The study reveals that there are far more design professionals in the Nordic countries than previously detected. Furthermore, the study offers new insights into how designers operate in a Nordic context. These insights are crucial in order to provide a more solid understanding of the design field in the Nordics.


The study is based on an innovative methodological approach combining both classical and new sources of data.

VISIT: http://nordicdesignresource.com/

Non-anthropocentric Design

Resources and comments from:
Birger Sevaldson PhD
Professor
Institute of Design
Oslo School of Architecture and Design
www.aho.no
www.systemsorienteddesign.net
www.systemic-design.net
www.ocean-designresearch.net

RESOURCES:

Michael Hensel
https://scholar.google.no/citations?user=Dkm2bhAAAAAJ&hl=no&oi=sra
https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do;jsessionid=0ED50E775510022C17F1F0AFF5705CFC?uin=uk.bl.ethos.578023

https://books.google.no/books?hl=no&lr=&id=p4b0kAkak4IC&oi=fnd&pg=PP9&dq=michael+hensel+non-anthropocentric&ots=y6k1_uqnW8&sig=nYApZxE1N2CUxoalfmJOgRFjXjg&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=michael%20hensel%20non-anthropocentric&f=false

Marie Davidova published a thesis and some papers on involving the issue inspired by Hensel and others, demonstrating practice experiments involving biotic and abiotic agents in co-designing processes.
https://scholar.google.no/citations?user=khIp35kAAAAJ&hl=no&oi=sra

The rise of user centric design is truly problematic when looking beyond its obvious immediate benefits. We should be able to have a multi-centric design approach, an approach that is systemic. (ref. www.systemsorienteddesign.net  and www.systemic-design.net  )
Mayve user centric design is the most anthropocentric design perspective?

Here some sources criticising user centric design:

Norman, D. A. (2005). Human-centred design considered harmful. Interactions, 12(4), 14–19. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Donald_Norman/publication/200086092_Human-centered_design_considered_harmful/links/0c9605208fca197c2e000000.pdf

Wagenknecht, S. (2017). Beyond non-/use: The affected bystander and her escalation. New Media & Society, 1461444817708775.


From Erik:
I recently published a storybook, Designer and Goldcrest, intended as an accessible introduction to some more-than-human perspectives on design. It’s freely available here: https://www.sorgenfripress.se.

Jönsson, L. (2014). Design events: On explorations of a non-anthropocentric framework in design. The Royal DanishAcademy of Fine Arts, School of Design.

Avila, M. (2012). Devices. On Hospitality, Hostility and Design. HDK – School of Design and Crafts Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.


The Cost of Design UK

DesignHistorySociety

Design History Annual Conference 2019: The Cost of Design
Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK
5-7 September 2019

‘The Cost of Design’ explores the complexities of the historic and contemporary relationship between design and economy. Design is both influenced by, and can shape, economic systems. Both ‘cost’ and ‘economy’ are to be understood beyond their financial implications. ‘Cost’ is en-visaged as the exchange of resources, meaning or value. The conference looks at how design sustains, accelerates or challenges dominant systems and examines the resulting social, cultur-al, economic or environmental consequences that arise. It examines the roles of design in rap-idly changing economies, examining the relationship between technological advances and the economy. ‘The Cost of Design’ also looks at design’s relationship to the political economy and the global/regional/local exchanges occurring within. Design practices can react to, resist, challenge or seek to influence economies that are viewed to negatively impact in some way. The ways in which design has been used to affect positive change within economic systems will also be examined.
The conference welcomes historic, contemporary and interdisciplinary approaches to the top-ic, and invites contributions from design historians, scholars, and academics in related fields, as well as design practitioners and educators, museum professionals and students.

Topics might include:

Technological and changing economies
·       Impact of automation
·       Digitisation of design culture
·       Hybridisation of physical and virtual spaces

Political economies and global/local exchange
·       Supply chains, manufacture and relocation vis-à-vis geopolitical and cultural borders
·       Challenges to/persistence of dichotomies of North/South; East/West; Centre/Periphery
·       Dynamics of transcultural (intra- or extra regional) design
·       The relationship between design and soft power
·       Appropriation and Copyright

Resistance, sharing economies and design
·       Design for “post-growth” economies
·       Political design in a national/regional/local context
·       Artisanal/craft solutions
·       Indigenous autonomy
·       Designing for wellbeing, happiness and social values

Individual papers of 20 minutes, or proposals for full panels of three papers related to the top-ics listed above or theme of ‘The Cost of Design’ will be considered. Panel proposals must in-clude abstracts for all three papers, in addition to a short description of the panel theme.
All proposals will be double-blind reviewed and selected by the conference committee.

Submissions are due Monday, 25 February 2019 and should:
1.      Be sent in the form of a Microsoft Word document (.doc, .docx)
2.      Not exceed 300 words
3.      Include the title of the paper
4.      Include the author’s full name, title, position and institution
5.      Include a brief professional biography (not exceeding 50 words)
Submissions should be sent to costofdesign.dhs2019@gmail.com to the attention of the Academic Convener.
The Design History Society at https://www.designhistorysociety.org/