Tag Archives: business

Design and Research Perspectives in the Era of Transformations

VISIT:  https://designinnovationmanagement.com/adim2019/

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Design will kill Marketing

Design will kill marketing, says Ikea’s former design chief

Marcus Engman is leaving Ikea to run a consultancy that convinces companies to spend their marketing budget on what matters: design.

[Photo: Ikea]

For the past six years, Marcus Engman has successfully made Ikea weird.

As the company’s head of design, he spearheaded artistic collaborations on tropical furniture and L.A.-inspired skateboards to push the reserved Swedish furniture giant out of its minimalist comfort zone. But Engman recently left Ikea to start a company of his own called Skewed Productions, as a partner of the design firm Doberman. Think of Skewed as a hybrid of design studio and ad agency–its goal is to create marketing moments for companies through product design itself. Instead of spending money on ad buys, Engman wants to teach companies to market themselves through their design.

“I want to show there’s an alternative to marketing, which is actually design,” says Engman. “And if you work with design and communications in the right way, that would be the best kind of marketing, without buying media.”

[Photo: Ikea]

His plan makes some sense. In a consumer-obsessive world, design has become a major selling point. Consumers study everything from Kickstarter campaigns built upon the personal journeys of inventors to Apple’s Jony Ive-narrated iPhone videos to hear the intent and motivation behind the products we buy.“More and more people are interested in how things are made,” says Engman. “I believe in transparency–being more transparent in design you do–that attracts interest and over time it builds interest in the project.”

But for companies that don’t necessarily “get” design–whether that’s individual product development, or how to marry a whole line of products into one grounding thesis that can define a brand–Engman sees an opportunity for flexible, design-oriented people to help out in a hands-on consulting and development capacity. “It’s one ballgame in fashion,” he says, “and a completely different one in how we work in furniture, for instance.”

[Screenshot: Skewed Productions]

Skewed Productions is a one-man show. Before Ikea, Engman has had his own agency with 30 employees under him. Now, he plans to hire out collaborators from his network on a per-project basis. He argues that this new model will be more equitable for everyone involved, because he plans to share profits with his team, rather than paying out stock salaries. And it will allow him to take on projects more flexibly, since his crew can always be in flux. While he cautions me that Skewed is only four days into existence, and he’s just building a client roster, he’d like to have a mix of large companies and small startup clients to keep work varied.

As for his legacy, and why it was time to leave Ikea? “I think there comes a time when you feel you want to do something else. I’m not a maintainer guy. I’m a startup guy. And I was put there to make a lot of changes. And we made a lot,” he says. “Working at a large company, it’s about leading by strategy and finding new partners. I wanted to, not go backwards, but be even closer to the design, to be able to do design myself again.”

From: fastcompany

 

Random Oblique Strategies

Oblique Strategies, originally presented as a pack of cards, were by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt. Each Oblique Strategy is a phrase or cryptic remark which can be used to break a creative deadlock or dilemma situation.

This website presents a random Oblique Strategy selected from editions 1–5.

http://www.joshharrison.net/oblique-strategies/

Website by Josh Harrison

The Non-Designer´s Guide to Design Thinking

 

 This book illustrates the key components of mastering design thinking based on the author’s experience at the Institute of Design of Illinois Institute of Technology, one of the most famous Design schools in the world.

The author highlights the difference between the business world and the design world based on his own experience.

His big transition from the logical world of business, as former P&G marketer, to the design world.

His experience helps non-designers learn design thinking by providing comparisons to business protocol.

 

The author categorized the key components of design thinking into 4 parts: 

1. Thinking: Hybrid Thinking 

2. Mindset: Creator Spirit 

3. Process: Human Centered Co-Creation 

4. Environment: Switching to Creative mode through Tools and Space

   In later chapters, the author proposes the framework of how to start a career in the business design world and finally how design thinking might influence your well-being. This book is a compass for you, and and any non-designer, to start mastering design thinking.

In this book you will:

 Understand how non-designers can learn design thinking

 Understand the four components of a design thinker

More information at: http://www.nondesignersguidetodesignthinking.com/

Design & Neoliberalism: Special Issue

This special issue of Design and Culture examines the ways in which neoliberalism has both expanded and constricted the purview of design across multiple disciplines, including (but not limited to) product design, interaction design, graphic design, advertising, branding, fashion, digital media, experience design, web design, architecture, furniture, and other adjacent areas of inquiry and practice.
This call for papers seeks submissions that engage global perspectives on the intersections between design and neoliberalism across this wide variety of design and design-related fields. Of particular interest are submissions engaging historical perspectives, the context of the Global South, and questions of labor.
Neoliberalism has emerged over the past decade or so as a totalizing conceptual apparatus for understanding a wide array of contemporary phenomena. Whether understood politically as a system of governance that submits all functions to the authority of market directives, economically as the financialization of capitalism, or socially as the erosion of collective institutions, neoliberalism has impacted cultural production in myriad ways.
Design, when analyzed critically, has often been portrayed as complicit if not synonymous with these transformations. As Guy Julier has observed, “Design takes advantage of and normalizes the transformations that neoliberalism provokes” (Julier 2014). That is to say, design practices in this context not only organize themselves according to neoliberal political, economic, and social goals and systems, but also promote neoliberal structures and values.
Much existing work on the intersection between neoliberalism and design focuses upon the fields of architecture and urbanism, as well as humanitarian design and design activism. This issue seeks to examine connections between design and neoliberalism that have yet to be explored.
How have neoliberal economic policies shaped and constrained design, and how has design contributed to the financialization of previously uncommodified sectors of life?
How has design adapted to the increasing proliferation of global networks of exchange?
In what ways has design discourse intersected with neoliberal ideologies about work, value, creativity, experience, politics, institutions, etc.?
Topics for consideration may include, but are not limited to:
  1. • Historical convergences and/or divergences of design and neoliberalism
  2. • Design and globalization and/or nationalism
  3. • Neoliberal design ideologies in the context of international development
  4. • Race and racism at the intersection of design and neoliberalism
  5. • Discourses of innovation and “design thinking”
  6. • Design and labor and/or class
  7. • The coalescence of design and business in both the academy and industry
  8. • Conflicts and convergences between neoliberal design and modernist traditions
  9. • Indigenous design in the context of neoliberalism
  10. • Design, neoliberalism, and postcoloniality
  11. • Challenges to neoliberal design ideologies and practices
  12. • Neoliberalism and design pedagogy

Submission deadline: November 30, 2018

Manuscripts should be between 5,000 and 7,000 words long, including notes and references, and may include 4–8 images. For additional submission guidelines, please visit: http://designandculture.org/page/submissions.
All manuscripts will be externally reviewed and should be submitted through Design and Culture’s online portal: http://www.designandcultureadmin.org/index.php/dc/login.
After submitting, please email the title of your paper to the guest editors:
Arden Stern – arden.stern at artcenter.edu
Sami Siegelbaum – samisiegelbaum at gmail.com