Tag Archives: design research

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Who is Leading the Pack in Design Research and Why?

Where Industry Meets Academia: Who is Leading the Pack in Design Research and Why?

Hosted by the CAA Committee on Design
Chair: Dan Wong
Email: dan@dan-wong.com

Is industry making the greatest contribution and impact to design, or is research in the academy doing it behind the scenes? Is it time for more PhD programs in design?

This panel discussion will span design disciplines. We invite academic design researchers, design practitioners, agency principals, and design entrepreneurs to participate in this discussion of the investment in design research and the establishment of contemporary design thinking, methodologies, and technologies.

The deadline to submit your proposal is August 6th 2017. Please follow the guidelines here: http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/programs/conference/CAA-CFP-2019.pdf.

Proposals (including a title and 250 words maximum) should be sent to dan@dan-wong.com

Please note that a current CAA: Advancing Art and Design membership is required to participate in the conference. However, If you are not a member of CAA at the time you submit the proposal, you can still submit—email CAA Membership Services at membership@collegeart.org or call them directly at 212-392-4430 and they can create a temporary CAA account number so that you can move forward with your submission.

Please see the following list of FAQ for more information:
http://www.collegeart.org/programs/conference/FAQ

“Twentieth-Century Design and the Immigrant Professional in the Americas”

Seeking contributors for a session, “Twentieth-Century Design and the Immigrant Professional in the Americas” at the College Art Association annual meeting from February 13-16, 2019 in New York City.

Please submit a 300-500 word abstract to mcguirel at hawaii.edu by the deadline of August 6th.

Session abstract:
Although the significant contributions of European designers who fled Nazi Europe for North and Latin America have been long recognized by historians, the broader situation of immigrant professionals – from across the globe – in twentieth-century design history remains an area ripe for scholarly examination.

This session seeks to complicate and enrich our understanding of the roles of immigrant commercial, industrial, and decorative designers in the Americas. As newcomers either by choice or by force, immigrant professionals faced singular challenges as they sought to adapt to their adopted lands.

To what degrees did the economic, ethnic, and professional difficulties they encountered shape the products of American design, design practice, and design culture?

To these ends, papers might examine not only immigrants’ professional strategies and successes but also their challenges and failures.

How did social, economic, and personal hardships, such as racism, discrimination, and cultural politics affect their professional labors?

Did the ideas and methodologies that they brought with them sometimes fail to translate in their new professional, cultural, and aesthetic spheres, and if so, what can these reveal about the history of twentieth-century American design?

Alternatively, how have some immigrant designers or immigrant groups proposed concepts that fundamentally challenged and altered the status quo?

From a historiographic perspective, how have dominant histories of design hindered a more nuanced history of the American immigrant experience?

Papers that examine lesser-known practitioners are particularly welcome, as are papers that interrogate the works of canonical designers from a perspective that highlights their status as immigrants.

Designing with and for People with Dementia

Designing with and for People with Dementia: Wellbeing, Empowerment and HappinessInternational Conference 2019 of the MinD consortium, the DRS Special Interest Group on Behaviour Change and the DRS Special Interest Group on Wellbeing and Happiness
Date: Thursday-Friday 19-20 September 2019

Venue: TU Dresden, Germany
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Design & Neoliberalism: Special Issue

This special issue of Design and Culture examines the ways in which neoliberalism has both expanded and constricted the purview of design across multiple disciplines, including (but not limited to) product design, interaction design, graphic design, advertising, branding, fashion, digital media, experience design, web design, architecture, furniture, and other adjacent areas of inquiry and practice.
This call for papers seeks submissions that engage global perspectives on the intersections between design and neoliberalism across this wide variety of design and design-related fields. Of particular interest are submissions engaging historical perspectives, the context of the Global South, and questions of labor.
Neoliberalism has emerged over the past decade or so as a totalizing conceptual apparatus for understanding a wide array of contemporary phenomena. Whether understood politically as a system of governance that submits all functions to the authority of market directives, economically as the financialization of capitalism, or socially as the erosion of collective institutions, neoliberalism has impacted cultural production in myriad ways.
Design, when analyzed critically, has often been portrayed as complicit if not synonymous with these transformations. As Guy Julier has observed, “Design takes advantage of and normalizes the transformations that neoliberalism provokes” (Julier 2014). That is to say, design practices in this context not only organize themselves according to neoliberal political, economic, and social goals and systems, but also promote neoliberal structures and values.
Much existing work on the intersection between neoliberalism and design focuses upon the fields of architecture and urbanism, as well as humanitarian design and design activism. This issue seeks to examine connections between design and neoliberalism that have yet to be explored.
How have neoliberal economic policies shaped and constrained design, and how has design contributed to the financialization of previously uncommodified sectors of life?
How has design adapted to the increasing proliferation of global networks of exchange?
In what ways has design discourse intersected with neoliberal ideologies about work, value, creativity, experience, politics, institutions, etc.?
Topics for consideration may include, but are not limited to:
  1. • Historical convergences and/or divergences of design and neoliberalism
  2. • Design and globalization and/or nationalism
  3. • Neoliberal design ideologies in the context of international development
  4. • Race and racism at the intersection of design and neoliberalism
  5. • Discourses of innovation and “design thinking”
  6. • Design and labor and/or class
  7. • The coalescence of design and business in both the academy and industry
  8. • Conflicts and convergences between neoliberal design and modernist traditions
  9. • Indigenous design in the context of neoliberalism
  10. • Design, neoliberalism, and postcoloniality
  11. • Challenges to neoliberal design ideologies and practices
  12. • Neoliberalism and design pedagogy

Submission deadline: November 30, 2018

Manuscripts should be between 5,000 and 7,000 words long, including notes and references, and may include 4–8 images. For additional submission guidelines, please visit: http://designandculture.org/page/submissions.
All manuscripts will be externally reviewed and should be submitted through Design and Culture’s online portal: http://www.designandcultureadmin.org/index.php/dc/login.
After submitting, please email the title of your paper to the guest editors:
Arden Stern – arden.stern at artcenter.edu
Sami Siegelbaum – samisiegelbaum at gmail.com

The hidden women in architecture and design

>>At the New Yorker Magazine: “The hidden women…”

Article from Alexandra Lange – architecture critic for Curbed.