Tag Archives: design research

Non-anthropocentric Design

Resources and comments from:
Birger Sevaldson PhD
Professor
Institute of Design
Oslo School of Architecture and Design
www.aho.no
www.systemsorienteddesign.net
www.systemic-design.net
www.ocean-designresearch.net

RESOURCES:

Michael Hensel
https://scholar.google.no/citations?user=Dkm2bhAAAAAJ&hl=no&oi=sra
https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do;jsessionid=0ED50E775510022C17F1F0AFF5705CFC?uin=uk.bl.ethos.578023

https://books.google.no/books?hl=no&lr=&id=p4b0kAkak4IC&oi=fnd&pg=PP9&dq=michael+hensel+non-anthropocentric&ots=y6k1_uqnW8&sig=nYApZxE1N2CUxoalfmJOgRFjXjg&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=michael%20hensel%20non-anthropocentric&f=false

Marie Davidova published a thesis and some papers on involving the issue inspired by Hensel and others, demonstrating practice experiments involving biotic and abiotic agents in co-designing processes.
https://scholar.google.no/citations?user=khIp35kAAAAJ&hl=no&oi=sra

The rise of user centric design is truly problematic when looking beyond its obvious immediate benefits. We should be able to have a multi-centric design approach, an approach that is systemic. (ref. www.systemsorienteddesign.net  and www.systemic-design.net  )
Mayve user centric design is the most anthropocentric design perspective?

Here some sources criticising user centric design:

Norman, D. A. (2005). Human-centred design considered harmful. Interactions, 12(4), 14–19. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Donald_Norman/publication/200086092_Human-centered_design_considered_harmful/links/0c9605208fca197c2e000000.pdf

Wagenknecht, S. (2017). Beyond non-/use: The affected bystander and her escalation. New Media & Society, 1461444817708775.


From Erik:
I recently published a storybook, Designer and Goldcrest, intended as an accessible introduction to some more-than-human perspectives on design. It’s freely available here: https://www.sorgenfripress.se.

Jönsson, L. (2014). Design events: On explorations of a non-anthropocentric framework in design. The Royal DanishAcademy of Fine Arts, School of Design.

Avila, M. (2012). Devices. On Hospitality, Hostility and Design. HDK – School of Design and Crafts Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.


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The Intergalactic Design Guide

“Design has built global brands, disrupted industries, and transformed our lives with technology. It has also contributed to the complex challenges we face today. In The Intergalactic Design Guide, business strategist and designer Cheryl Heller shows how social design can help address our most pressing challenges, from poverty to climate change.

Social design offers a new approach to navigate uncertainty, increase creativity, strengthen relationships, and develop our capacity to collaborate. Innovative leaders like Paul Farmer, Oprah Winfrey, and Marshall Ganz have instinctively practiced social design for decades. Heller has worked with many of these pioneers, observing patterns in their methods and translating them into an approach that can bring new creative energy to any organization. From disrupting the notion of “expert” by seeking meaningful input from many voices to guiding progress through open-ended questions instead of five-year plans, social design changes how humans relate to each other, with powerful positive impacts.

The Intergalactic Design Guide explains eleven common principles, a step-by-step process, and the essential skills for successful social design. Nine in-depth examples—from the CEO of the largest carpet manufacturer in the world to a young entrepreneur with a passion for reducing food waste—illustrate the social design process in action.

Social design is a new kind of creative leadership that generates both traditional and social value, and can change the way we all view our work. Whether you are launching a start-up or managing a global NGO, The Intergalactic Design Guide provides both inspiration and practical steps for designing a more resilient and fulfilling future.”
Visit: Island Press

Follow author at LinkedIn

Design and Research Perspectives in the Era of Transformations

VISIT:  https://designinnovationmanagement.com/adim2019/

If you are in LinkedIn: We-need-you-support- to-early-career-researchers-from-erik-bohemia

Semiotics and Design

Semiotics Links from Umberto Eco´s site.

The International Center for Semiotic Sciences Umberto Eco (University of Urbino) organizes a series of colloquia, seminars and lectures on semiotic theory and practices.
One of them is co-organized by PROJEKT Lab (University of Nimes), the title is: When is Design .

Visit PROJEKT Lab

Visit PROJEKT Lab Resources – Design / French / English

View the Program of “When is Design” at Google Drive

Elements of a shared theory of science for design

“Higher education for the design professions – designers, architects and engineers – has been combining traditional disciplines of research and design in new ways, into what is now known as design research. As a discipline in its own right, design research is still quite young, and the design professions need a theory of science that takes their specific character into account, thus contributing to their self-image, and locating them in the greater landscape of research. Using philosophically oriented conceptual analysis I develop a system of basic concepts as elements of such a theory of science for the design professions. The concepts of design, research and design research are analysed, clarified and coordinated, in relation to concepts such as knowledge, theory and practice. At the same time I propose a precise, yet intuitive, terminology that may be shared and foster cross-disciplinary understanding and communication among the design professions, and which each of them can expand for purposes of its own.”

BY:

Per Galle
Institut for Bygningskunst & Design / Department of Architecture & Design
Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi, Designskolen / The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design

                       ACCESS PAPER AT INGENTA

Atmosphere 11 ADAPTATION

 

‘Atmosphere’ is an annual, interdisciplinary design symposium advancing academic enrichment and inter-disciplinary research by creating an opportunity for students, instructors, and friends of the faculty to interact with distinguished keynote speakers, scholars and designers from around the world. The three-day event includes invited lecturers, peer-reviewed presentations, exhibitions, student installations, receptions, and numerous casual opportunities for serious exchange.

Atmosphere is the consequence of the projects we make as designers of landscapes, cities, buildings, and interiors. Atmosphere is hard to grasp, and even harder to talk about – yet the production of atmosphere, intended or not, is one of our most apparent contributions to the world. Though palpable, atmosphere resists registration. So fragile and dependent on the world around, atmosphere is also susceptible to our perception. It is not something that can be read or interpreted. It is.

 

‘Atmosphere’ 11 will explore ADAPTATION. This theme intends to attract researchers from diverse disciplines into an open but topically oriented exchange. ADAPTATION is a mutation, a change that aids organisms to thrive in their environments. ADAPTATION implicates designers as organisms with the particular places, materials, contingencies and intentions that enable survival or better living in an increasingly unpredictable environment. In other words, this symposium will examine not merely what and how we adapt, but the sites and situations of adaptation. The aim is to critically and creatively explore how contextual, cultural and environmental circumstances of our world serve as meaningful catalysts for design, building, teaching and research within a discussion of atmosphere and adaptation. This theme encompasses multifaceted, dynamic scales and terrains including the complexities of our social fabrics, intricacies of environmental function, potentials of adaptation as process, as fitness, the materials and patina of our everyday adaptations, and the stories and arguments that share understandings of our designed world. Do we engage in pre-ADAPTATION? Do we register atmosphere through adaptation?

The Faculty of Architecture has hosted an ‘Atmosphere’ symposium each year for the last ten years. ‘Atmosphere’ invites exploration of the less physical conditions of design: the temporary, experiential, situational, phenomenal and epiphenomenal states of our shared world. Difficult to pin-down, capture and express, ‘atmosphere’ is enveloping yet recessive. It is what we as designers, planners and interpreters of the built and natural world strive to generate, understand, and meaningfully engage.

VISIT: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/architecture/atmosphere/2019/

 

Random Oblique Strategies

Oblique Strategies, originally presented as a pack of cards, were by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt. Each Oblique Strategy is a phrase or cryptic remark which can be used to break a creative deadlock or dilemma situation.

This website presents a random Oblique Strategy selected from editions 1–5.

http://www.joshharrison.net/oblique-strategies/

Website by Josh Harrison