Tag Archives: innovation

The Non-Designer´s Guide to Design Thinking

 

 This book illustrates the key components of mastering design thinking based on the author’s experience at the Institute of Design of Illinois Institute of Technology, one of the most famous Design schools in the world.

The author highlights the difference between the business world and the design world based on his own experience.

His big transition from the logical world of business, as former P&G marketer, to the design world.

His experience helps non-designers learn design thinking by providing comparisons to business protocol.

 

The author categorized the key components of design thinking into 4 parts: 

1. Thinking: Hybrid Thinking 

2. Mindset: Creator Spirit 

3. Process: Human Centered Co-Creation 

4. Environment: Switching to Creative mode through Tools and Space

   In later chapters, the author proposes the framework of how to start a career in the business design world and finally how design thinking might influence your well-being. This book is a compass for you, and and any non-designer, to start mastering design thinking.

In this book you will:

 Understand how non-designers can learn design thinking

 Understand the four components of a design thinker

More information at: http://www.nondesignersguidetodesignthinking.com/

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The difference between Inclusive Design and Accessibility

If you’re familiar with what we do here at Eone, you probably know that we’re an inclusive design company, known for our feature product, the Bradley timepiece.

But what is inclusive design? And what’s the difference between inclusive design and accessibility? We’d love to tell you more about our design philosophy and why it’s important!

Two things we really care about are good design and inclusion for people with disabilities. What started as a simple problem shared between friends blossomed into Eone: a company with a social mission to create beautiful, functional products that meet the needs of as many people as possible. And that’s the core of inclusive design.

The Problem With Good Design: Why Good Design Isn’t Good Enough

The truth is that “good design” considers the best form and function for some people, but excludes many people on the basis of ability — and individuals with disabilities are often left out. We want to change that.

We’ve built Eone on our core conviction that design should be inclusive, bringing more people in instead of shutting them out. We believe that design shouldn’t discriminate or divide us up, but bring us together.

We believe that individuals with disabilities should have equal and integrated access to quality products, services, and structures — that everyone has a right to enjoy beautiful, functional design, and that we all benefit when we enjoy design together.

We believe inclusive design is a social justice issue.

Through inclusive design, we’re creating the change we wish to see in the world.

What is Inclusive Design?

Sometimes called universal design, inclusive design considers as many people’s needs and abilities as possible. Instead of assuming a one-size-fits-all user experience, inclusive design aims to please a diverse range of individuals and accommodate a variety of experiences and ways of interacting with the world.

Inclusive design recognizes that our needs shift with time and circumstance, so it anticipates different ways an individual might interact with the world as life goes on. Aging, permanent or temporary disability, carrying a load of grocery bags, pushing a stroller, or sitting in a business meeting are some examples of circumstances that impact how you interact with the world around you — circumstances that might change what you do or how you do things.

What’s the Difference Between Inclusive Design and Accessibility?

While inclusive design considers from the very beginning how something might be easily useful and enjoyable for as many individuals as possible, accessibility traditionally means making special considerations for people with disabilities. It’s the difference between designing a watch that can be read by touch or sight, and taking a standard analog watch and adding braille instead of numbers. The first example considers the functionality and beauty of a watch that doesn’t require sight, while the second example tries to take something designed for vision and make it work for touch without addressing some of the problems this modification creates.

Unlike assistive devices, inclusive design doesn’t specifically target people with disabilities. While assistive devices fill in the gaps left by exclusionary design practices, inclusive design aims to evolve products beyond their conventional definitions, changing our standards for products. Assistive devices aim to remove a barrier for people with disabilities. Inclusive design strives to fundamentally redesign a product so that the barrier does not exist in the first place. Assistive technology is reactive. Inclusive design is proactive.

How Eone Approaches Accessibility

At Eone, we utilize both approaches: building accessibility into what we do from the beginning, and addressing issues of access on platforms we use but do not own.

There are certain cases in which Eone cannot make something inclusive because we do not have control over design and user experience, such as social media platforms, retailer partner websites, and other properties we do not own. However, to the best of our ability, we aim to make accessible our use of platforms and third party sites — using the features available to us in ways that accommodate the most users.

From Eone website

The World’s First Co-learning space is Amazing and it´ll be in Brazil!

A brazilian place for Education, Design, Innovation and Technology.

How I feel when I see the Colearning Space project

I had the privilege of growing up in a Culture of Learning.

It took moments of isolation, deep abstractions and focus for me to develop the autonomy and the freedom to experiment, create and imagine how things could be different.

This has become the best part of me. And throughout the years I’ve learned that I connect with people by ideas.

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Workshop in Inclusive Design from DMI

Jeanine Spence

Principal, Current Associates

Inclusive Design Workshop

Inclusive Design considers the full range of human diversity to deliver better experiences for everyone. This workshop  will help you focus on both a mind shift and changes to your design and research methods that will:

  • Help you recognize your biases/exclusion
  • Alter your practices to reduce exclusion
  • Help you see ways to bring others along on the transformation journey

This workshop starts with an overview of Inclusive Design principles, the impacts of exclusion, and the business case for inclusion. The centerpiece of the workshop is the Inclusive Design Practices Framework, an immersive examination of how learning from diverse lived experiences challenges designers to approach problems from new perspectives and to let go of the fictional “average customer”.

This approach moves past typical accessibility considerations to emphasize making products and services that work better for everyone. In the concluding section, participants reflect on how their design and research practices will evolve when inclusion is the focus.

Who Should Attend?

  • Designers / Design Leaders
  • Design Researchers
  • Product Managers
  • Individual contributors whose work has an impact on the future of the organization
  • Human Resources Professionals

What Will You Learn?

  • You’ll learn to recognize how products and experiences unintentionally exclude people.
  • Get a framework that will give you concrete ways to include more perspectives and create more inclusive results for a broader impact.

Pricing:

This workshop is being held in conjunction with the Innovative Thinking on Diversity & Inclusion Conference
If you are attending the conference: $300 per person

If you are not attending the conference: $450 per person

Register for The Workshop Here

Location:

LPK Mansion and Innoventures Hall
22 Garfield Place
Cincinnati, OH

Pentagram’s Natasha Jen: “Design is not a monster you ‘unleash’ to fix the world”

Speaking at this year’s Design Indaba, Pentagram partner Natasha Jen makes her feelings on business buzzwords, simplistic flow diagrams and sticky note brainstorm sessions very clear, insisting that the concept of “design thinking” undermines design.

Courtesy of Design Indaba and Pentagram

“It’s very hard to explain to people what a graphic designer does,” says Natasha Jen, partner at Pentagram’s New York office. “I think of my role as playing with words, symbols and images. It’s about making things tangible and understandable, and if we can make things delightful – that’s the goal.”

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Bio Design Call for Exhibition

Book by William Myers

If you or someone in your network has a biodesign or bioart project they would like to present, please see the attached Open Call.
The deadline is 15 March and the exhibition opening will be at the end of August. Some funds are available for production.
Projects of biodesign and bioart are welcome, as are proposals for workshops, debates, or other programming to spur engagement.
Exhibition: Biodesign: From Inspiration to Integration
Venue: Rhode Island School of Design (RISD)
Dates: 24 August – 27 September, 2018
Please spread the word. The guidelines are available here.
We are also seeking a Curatorial Assistant to help develop the show, the paid post is described here.
By William Myers –  curator, writer, and teacher based in Amsterdam.

BISTRO IN VITRO