Tag Archives: scientific research

Fractal Learning / Meta Thinking

There seems to be broad agreement on the urgent need to make sure that everyone (pre-work, working, and in transition) is equipped to navigate a world disrupted by radical and accelerating changes in the future of work, caused by AI and the 4th Industrial Revolution.

This urgent imperative may open up the opportunity to reinvent education, potentially utilizing recent advances in innovation frameworks, methods and practice. These suggest that learning can be radically accelerated and democratized, in part by leveraging technology and cloud-based knowledge libraries to break down silos and traditional hierarchies. As a result it can become more fundamentally flexible, iterative and self-directed (heutagogy).

The workshop outlined below is just a proof-of-concept for what we call fractal learning. It’s the roughest of drafts, sketched in response to a challenge: can we develop a “seed methodology”, a “Minimum Viable Instruction” package which starts any individual on a learning / innovating / goal-achieving journey, spiraling out from the first iterative cycle to acquire a broad and personalized toolbox of learning and problem-solving skills.

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The Eight Kinds of Articles Published by Scholarly Journals

Photo by DKrue/Pixabay, CC0.

Academic and scientific journals publish many different types of articles, and the names and categories they use to label and describe those documents are still more numerous. Scientific journals tend to focus on different kinds of articles than humanities journals do, and even when they publish similar kinds of articles, they often refer to them differently. This means that each basic type of scholarly article tends to have more than one name. What might be called a research article in one journal, for instance, might in another be labelled an empirical article, an original article, a full article or simply an article. A review article in one periodical could be referred to as a survey paper in the next, and the Brief Communications section in one journal might be entitled Micro-Articles in another.

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