Tag Archives: sustainability

Victor Papanek – the politics of Design

The Papanek Foundation presents the international travelling exhibition  Victor Papanek: The Politics of Design, co-curated by Alison J. Clarke, a cooperation between the Vitra Design Museum and the Barcelona Design Museum, in collaboration with the Victor J. Papanek Foundation, University of Applied Arts Vienna.

The expansive show presents varied and previously unseen materials from the Papanek Foundation archive pertaining to design activist Victor Papanek’s lifelong career, highlighting the crucial theme of design as a political and social tool.

Alongside the exploration of Papanek’s links with key thinkers and design figures, ranging from media theorist Marshall McLuhan, maverick futurist Buckminster Fuller to leading feminist graphic designer Sheila Levrant de Bretteville, the exhibition casts light on the legacy of 1960s and 1970s activism through the presentation of contemporary exhibits dealing with politically pertinent issues ranging from state violence, to climate change, bio-synthetics, and the precariousness of citizenship.

 

Victor Papanek: The Politics of Design features work from cutting edge practitioners including: Forensic Architecture; Faber Futures; Flui Colectivo; Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg; Femke Herregraven; NeuroSpeculative AfroFeminism/Hypen-Labs; Lucy and Jorge Orta; Tomás Saraceno; Maya Jay Varadaraj.

Victor Papanek: The Politics of Design
C-Mine Genk, Belgium
3 March 2020 – 12 July 2020

Visit Papanek Foundation

Ecological transition into a biocentric society

 

PORTUGUÊS – https://leonardoboff.org/2020/06/19/a-transicao-ecologica-para-uma-sociedade-biocentrada/

ESPAÑOL – http://www.servicioskoinonia.org/boff/articulo.php?num=993

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To understand the meaning of the coronavirus, we have to frame it in its proper context, not see it in isolation from the perspective of science and technique that are always necessary. The coronavirus comes from nature, against which human beings, particularly through global capitalism for centuries, have waged a systematic war against this nature and against the Earth.

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Designers wanted for COVID-19 project

 

In an urgent effort to mobilize the global design community to address the COVID-19 pandemic, the World Design Organization (WDO) is calling on all available designers to commit to an initiative that will propose design-led solutions to a number of pressing challenges that are affecting us all.

In collaboration with IBM’s Corporate Service Corps and Design for America, WDO set out last week to identify over 180 challenge statements from across the globe. In a 24-hour turnaround, these issues have been distilled into seven large themes with the greatest potential for impact if addressed now.

WDO is calling on all those designers who can commit some time to work remotely together over the course of the next 10-14 days. They are looking for participants and team leaders to build working groups around these themes immediately. If you would like to participate, submit your interest below.

This Coronavirus pandemic as we all know represents the greatest challenge we have faced collectively and as designers and design thinkers have a duty to use our considerable skills to do our part to help address some of its most significant challenges.

Given the urgency and the alarming rate of this pandemic, workgroups will start working as of Wednesday, 25 March 2020.

JOIN HERE

 

Degrowth

“Degrowth is about redistribution by design, not by collapse”

The architecture profession tends to assume that there is always more to build. We need more infrastructure, more houses and more office space to accommodate economies and societies that are forever expanding. Greedy though it may be, this mindset is supported by the pervasive belief that a society’s success is best measured not in terms of humane measures such as the capacity for care and play but in economic terms such as market expansion. The result for the built environment is constant reconfiguration and extension into new territory to a degree that our planet can barely sustain.

This growth obsession is a central premise of the Oslo Architecture Triennale 2019, Exploring how the endless pursuit of growth has caused planetary weariness and social division, the Triennale invites visitors to imagine what a society of Degrowth could be like and how architecture could serve it.

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Design Harvesting with Full Grown

Full Grown Ltd grows trees into shapes. Initially concentrating on furniture production like chairs, tables.

It´s one of the design futures and connects many concepts like circular economy, sustainability, biomimetics.

How far are we from growing our environment and all the possible objects?

THE FIRST SHOE MADE FROM CHEWING GUM

The soles of these shoes are made from recycled chewing gum
from the streets of Amsterdam.

In the Netherlands 1.5 million kilos of gum ends up on the street every year.
Making it the second most common litter after cigarettes.

By buying these shoes you contribute to the solution, by wearing them you show your support.

Design + Territory

DESIGNA 2018 – International Conference on Design Research
November 29-30 . FAL-UBI . Covilhã . Portugal

DESIGN + TERRITORY

DESIGNA celebrates its 7th edition in 2018, choosing to promote the debate and provide visibility to the ongoing research regarding the connection between Design and Territory, as well as its multiple and complex dimensions.

Design not only interacts with Territory, but it can also be one of the latter’s crucial transformation agents, due to the sizable and significant part it plays in the appreciation of local resources and contribution to identify and reveal the history, culture and predicates of communities where several of the products and services it projects are, in fact, generated.

Regardless, Design’s role understandably pivots around the conceptual innovation and renovation of products, production procedures, communication strategies and overall services associated with general goods. Thus, its focus could actually be quite efficient when altering the perception which distinct agents from a certain value chain may nurture about the potential of very diverse territories, particularly through its ability to integrate different scopes of human activity, from agriculture to tourism, craftsmanship to science, gastronomy to the industry.

Contemporary Design and the myriad of knowledge and values it encompasses may easily facilitate the dialogue, as well as integrate and explore multiple dimensions from historically underestimated individuals and communities, both locally and within more cosmopolitan spheres.

Design changes people’s lives, alters routines, shifts expectations, opens markets and, most of all, has the ability to – through the thought and projectual action that defines its practices – connect production’s several dimensions with the ones from distribution and fruition, as much in a local as in a global scale, bestowing them with a cultural purport.

Also, it is in concrete territories that transformation opportunities are created, through the development of actions and projects that are able to answer, from bottom up and in a participated manner, to the complex issues and restraints emerging from the operative social-economical models with an increasingly hegemonic propensity.

Design can undoubtedly contribute to build alternatives there. On the other hand, the duo Design / Territory summons the topics from DESIGNA’s previous editions, particularly the ones concerned with Projectual Hope, un/Sustainability and Identity, although multimedia interfaces and the overall components from desire and lapse can also be easily reflected and detected in it.

Deadline for abstract (extended) – July 15, 2018
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From the editor:
If you are portuguese speaker, the following book is highly recommended:
Design e Território by Lia Krucken Interview at ABC Design 

Regenerative Design and Ecosystem Biomimicry

‘This book examines and defines the field of biomimicry for sustainable built environment design and goes on to translate ecological knowledge into practical methodologies for architectural and urban design that can proactively respond to climate change and biodiversity loss. These methods are tested and exemplified through a series of case studies of existing cities in a variety of climates. Regenerative Urban Design and Ecosystem Biomimicry will be of great interest to students, professionals and researchers of architecture, urban design, ecology, and environmental studies, as well as those interested in the interdisciplinary study of sustainability, ecology and urbanism’.

Get a discount of 20% if you want to buy it. Enter the code FLR40 at the checkout.

You can find it online as a printed book or ebook here.

Or you can read quite a bit of it online for free via google books

Author:

Dr Maibritt Pedersen Zari

Senior Lecturer – Sustainable Architecture / Interior Architecture

School of Architecture  

Victoria University   – New Zealand

Academia.edu profile | Researchgate profile | Dr Maibritt Pedersen Zari research website